October 18, 2018 

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By Segment:

One

Being able to read is pretty essential to making your way in this world. Yet, more than half of Kentucky 4th graders are not proficient in reading. There's a camp for that and we talk with its director, Sarah Harcourt Watts. LISTEN

Two

With Thanksgiving around the bend - and the prospect of things getting dicey when Uncle Joe brings up politics - we have a pair of takes on the art of conversation about difficult things in troubled times. LISTEN

Three

And, the ultimate comfort food: freshly baked bread. A conversation with self-described "bread junky," Bluegrass Baking Co. owner Jim Betts. LISTEN

October 11, 2018 

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One

WEKU's new General Manager, Mike Savage on what makes public radio such a valuable resource and the sustaining power of listener contributions. LISTEN

Two

Steve Inskeep, MSU graduate and co-host of NPR's Morning Edition talks with Tom Martin about "living the news" and getting to work super early while finding the time to write books. LISTEN

Tom Martin (L) with Steve Inskeep at Broomwagon Coffee Shop in Lexington following Morning Edition

Three

James Mustich, the former Editor in Chief of the Barnes & Noble review discusses his new book, 1,000 Books You Must Read Before You Die. LISTEN

October 4, 2018 

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By segment:

One 

According to federal stats, the nursing home picture in Kentucky is dismal. John Cheves has poured through the numbers and spent the summer crisscrossing the state, interviewing and gathering information. The Lexington Herald-Leader investigative reporter joins us to share the results - and to discuss the state of investigative reporting. LISTEN

Two
Craig Hella Johnson was so deeply affected by news of the brutal murder of Matthew Shepard he composed a choral-drama in memory of the young gay Wyoming man who was beaten, tied to a fence and left to die. The production is now touring the country and is coming to Transylvania University in October. Johnson is our guest. 
Also in this segment: WEKU's Cheri Lawson reports on UK research into 
violence of a different nature: the domestic variety, and what one area group is doing to help its victims. LISTEN

Three
Find out about a group that provides free music lessons taught by PhDs. 
Tree Week is coming! We have details. And, an approach to 
conversation in which nobody is right or wrong. LISTEN

September 27, 2018 

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One

How to help young Kentucky parents overcome a unique set of challenges is the focus of a new report from Kentucky Youth Advocates (KYA) and the Annie E. Casey Foundation. Interviews with KYA Executive Director Terry Brooks. LISTEN

Two

More on helping young parents find their way in this interview with Cathe Dykstra of the Family Scholar House in Louisville. Also in this segment: It wasn't until the 1970s when Kentucky's leading newspapers-of-record began including on their pages reporting of the lives and times of African American citizens. It prompted UK special collections librarian Reinette Jones to create and curate the Notable Kentucky African Americans Database. She provides details. LISTEN

Three

The Blue Grass Army Depot just held another annual ten-county mock chemical weapons disaster drill. WEKU's Stu Johnson on why this one was of special significance. And, our September installment of "Humans of Central Appalachia" visits William "Buck" Wade of Keystone, West Virginia - the first African American coal mine safety inspector who went on to become Keystone's three-term mayor. The interview was selected from more than 400 gathered by photojournalist Malcolm Wilson.  LISTEN 

September 20, 2018 

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One

Ben Chandler, president, and CEO of the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky is guest co-host and interviews Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Barry Meier, author of "Pain Killer", the book that exposed the roots of opioid addiction. LISTEN

Two

Tom Martin interviews Van Ingram, Director of the Kentucky Office of Drug Policy, and Dr. Dinesh Mazloomdoost, Medical Director of Wellward Regenerative Medicine, discussing an alternative to pain pills. LISTEN 

Three

Ben Chandler returns for a conversation with Dr. David Bradford of the University of Georgia, discussing research into the impact of legalized medical marijuana on prescription drug use. LISTEN

This special edition of Eastern Standard is a prelude to a September 24 Lexington forum on Substance Abuse in Kentucky hosted by the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky.

September 13, 2018 

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One:

Explorers Dave and Amy Freeman have logged many thousands of miles hiking, kayaking, sailing,and dog-sledding, sharing their experiences via satellite with classrooms across the nation. Hear their story as they prepare to launch a new season of the EKU Chautauqua lecture series. LISTEN

Two:

Can wilderness preservation and economic development find harmony in the Red River Gorge? Hear about the search for that balance in our conversation with one who has been researching its prospects, EKU Associate Professor of Sociology, James Maples. LISTEN

Can humans who trek the Gorge maintain a peaceful coexistence with one of its residents: copperheads? EKU Biology Professor Stephen Richter discusses the study he leads. LISTEN (2nd interview)

How human behaviors impact our natural world and how these impacts have changed over time are focuses of the Pine Mountain Settlement School. Hear more from the director of this century-old Harlan County institution, Geoff Marietta. LISTEN (3rd interview)

Three:

Presidential historian Jon Meacham puts things in perspective in an interview with Lexington Herald-Leader columnist Tom Eblen. LISTEN

September 6, 2018 

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One

On June 3, 1962, a chartered Air France jet crashed on takeoff from Orly Airport in Paris. 106 of Atlanta's civic and arts leaders perished in the crash. Novelist Hannah Pittard, Director of the University of Kentucky's MFA Program in Creative Writing, discusses her historical fiction "Visible Empire," about the dynamics that play out in a community in the aftermath of such a catastrophe. LISTEN

Two

Lexington is among Scott Shapiro’s "University Cities.” What makes them special and what cautionary tales should they heed? We're joined by the Chief Innovation Officer in the administration of Lexington Mayor Jim Gray who was tasked with establishing a benchmark for Lexington’s future as home to a pair of universities within walking distance of its downtown. LISTEN

Three

The science behind "you are what you eat" (and what your mom and dad ate; and your grandparents.) A conversation with Alltech nutrigenomics research scientist Kirstin Brennan. LISTEN

August 30, 2018 

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One

A pair of Eastern Kentucky University scientists win a U.S. Patent for a compound that holds the promise of making chemotherapy more bearable and effective. It's only the second U.S. Patent awarded to EKU faculty in the university's history. And, find out why they call themselves "the underdog duo." LISTEN

Two

The Kentucky Center for Investigative Reporting has done the research and the outcome of the state legislature's 2014 juvenile justice reform legislation has been uneven, leaving behind black youth in Kentucky. We'll have a report by and conversation with KYCIR's Kate Howard. LISTEN

Three

Nobody tells the story of a culture better than the people who live it. Eastern Standard begins a monthly series in partnership with photojournalist Malcolm Wilson and his project, "Humans of Central Appalachia." Not only does Wilson carry a cameraLISTEN, he also totes around a recorder to capture voices as well as images. Our first stop: the Letcher County community of Blackey.

August 23, 2018 

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One

Of the more than 5,500  outdoor sculptures of historical figures in the United States, only 10% portray women. Yet, women comprise 51% of the U.S. population. If that doesn’t sound right to you, you have company in Lexington Urban-County Council-member Jennifer Mossotti. She is leading an effort to establish a monument honoring the accomplishments of women in Lexington and Fayette County. And WEKU's Mary Meehan pays a visit to the workplace of one such woman. Listen

Two

UK Sociologist Tony Bardo has research showing that cognitive decline in our later years does not necessarily mean we’re unhappy. Plus, reports on ways to prevent cognitive decline.  Listen

Three

KY Humanities’ Bill Goodman talks with bookseller Jay McCoy about the latest great reading from Kentucky authors. Listen

The Harstad Fine Arts Series: the first of recurring feature interviews highlighting off-the-radar places to listen to live music. Listen (This portion of Segment Three begins at 7:39)

August 16, 2018  

By segment

One & two

The harassment at youth sporting events has grown so rampant that more than 70 percent of new referees in all sports quit the job within three years, according to the National Association of Sports Officials. The chief cause for the attrition, based on a survey conducted by the association, is pervasive abuse from parents and coaches. Listen: Part I | Part II

Three

Kentucky Humanities Executive Director Bill Goodman takes us to the 41st annual Appalachian Writers Workshop at the Hindman Settlement School. Hear conversations with James Still Writer-in-Residence Rebecca Gayle Howell, noted Kentucky author Silas House and budding writer Tanya Torp, as well as Settlement School Director Brent Hutchison. Listen

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  1. August 16, 2018 - Full Program